Our Philosophy of Assessment

Assessment should have a purpose at every level for everyone involved:

  • Pupils should be given appropriate feedback on their learning from the formative assessments carried out by class teachers.
  • Class teachers should be able to use formative assessment to support planning and implementation of a curriculum designed to meet the needs of learners.
  • Teachers and school leaders should be able to use assessment to help ensure that the pupils who need specified intervention are quickly identified, appropriately supported and monitored so that all can fully achieve their potential.
  • School leaders should be able to use summative assessment as a tool for monitoring the progress and attainment pupils make, to ensure the school is helping all pupils achieve their potential.
  • Parents should be able to get a clear and accurate sense of their child’s achievement and progress as well as areas where they can support development.
  • Governors should be able to use the data to ensure the school is supporting pupils learning effectively.
  • The school can provide data for inspection teams to show how children are performing.
  • Local schools should collaborate to ensure assessment systems are robust through sharing of good practice and regular moderation.

The new National Curriculum has set out clear expectations for what children should achieve by the end of each Key Stage, and for English, Maths and Science, has provided guidance as to when in each phase this content should be covered. 

To meet age related expectations, children should reach secure by the end of the appropriate year.  To move from secure  in one stage to the next is 3 steps progress, which equates to an average of 1 step or 1 point of progress each half term.  This is on-track or expected progress.

Year 1 pupils who are working below the beginning of the Year 1 band could still be assessed using the EYFS 40-60w, 40-60w+, 40-60s or 40-60s+ month band steps.  Pupils working below the beginning of the Year 1 band with recognised SEND may be assessed using P-Scales.

Reporting to Parents

All parents receive a written report of their child’s progress and attainment in the Summer term.  Where appropriate this will also include the results of any National Curriculum tests.  In this report, the children’s attainment in the foundation subjects is also detailed in relation to their year group attainment targets, as well as an assessment of the child’s effort in these subjects.  Parents are also offered formal opportunities to discuss their child’s progress and attainment in Parents’ Evenings in the Autumn and Spring terms.

Standardisation and Moderation

Internal moderation of class books is carried out regularly each term.  We take part in moderation meetings within our partnership to ensure parity in our judgement and engage in Local Authority moderation processes to confirm our decisions.

End of Key Stage Assessments

2016 was is the first year that children at the end of both Key Stage 1 and Key Stage 2 were assessed against the new National Curriculum.  In addition, from 2016 attainment in national curriculum tests was no longer be reported in levels.  Instead, scaled scores were used.

Scaled scores help test results to be reported consistently from one year to the next. National curriculum tests are designed to be as similar as possible year on year, but slight differences in difficulty will occur between years. Scaled scores maintain their meaning over time so that two pupils achieving the same scaled score in different years will have demonstrated the same attainment.

A scaled score of 100 will always represent the ‘expected standard’.

A pupil’s scaled score will be based on their raw score. The raw score is the total number of marks a pupil receives in a test, based on the number of questions they answered correctly. The pupil’s raw score will be translated into a scaled score using a conversion table.   In KS1, teachers will need to use these to translate pupils’ raw scores into scaled scores to see whether each pupil has met the expected standard. For the 2016 KS2 tests STA will publish test results on the NCA tools website and each pupil will receive a raw score (the number of raw marks awarded), a scaled score and confirmation of whether or not they attained the expected standard.

Data - Early Years Foundation Stage

EYFS

In Early Years teachers assess children on entry to Nursery and Reception.  In the first half of the Autumn term, teaching staff observe the children in a variety of task and play based situations to facilitate assessment judgments to be made against a set of statements.  This enables staff to support children where necessary with appropriate intervention and monitor their progress as they advance through school.

In Reception, children are continuing to be assessed against the Foundation Stage Profile.  Evidence for judgments against each of the statements is collected through observations, books and discussions, and depending on these judgments children may be described as having achieved the ‘Good Level of Development’ measure at the end of the Reception year.  The school engages in regular moderation of these judgments within our partnership of schools.  

Standards on leaving the Early Years Foundation  Stage (EYFS)

 

 

Standards at the end of reception are above average

EYFS achieving good level of development

2016: 82%

2015- 77%

2014- 66%

 

National Standard 2016: 69%

Data - Phonics Check 

Year 1 and Year 2 Phonics Check

In June, all Year 1 pupils’ progress in phonics will be assessed.  Each child will be assessed individually by their teacher.  They will be asked to read 20 real and 20 pseudo-words in order to assess their decoding ability.  Any child currently in Year 2 who either did not take the test in Year 1 or did not achieve the pass mark last year will also take the test.

Phonics Screening Check

 

 

Percentage of year 1 pupils achieving the required standard of phonic decoding

2016: 90%

2015- 83%

2014- 70%

 

National Standard 2016: 81%

 

Data - KS1 and KS2 Results

 Following considerable changes to the structure of assessment at KS1 and KS2 from summer 2016, the performance data for all primary schools is no longer presented as national curriculum levels. Instead, levels have been removed and in their place is a national ‘Expected Standard’ for Year 2 and 6 children to meet. This standard is met by achieving at least 100 on a scaled score in reading; spelling, punctuation and grammar (SPaG); and mathematics in SAT tests in year 6 and in teacher assessment at year 2. Further, children who achieve a score of 110+ on the scaled score are identified as attaining a ‘Higher Standard’.
Outcomes in writing are measured by assessments made by teaching staff, moderated by the local authority.

The progress measure for the year group indicates whether the children, collectively, have made progress ‘below’, ‘in line with’ or ‘above’ expectation nationally. A progress score of 0 means pupils in a school (on average) do about as well at KS2 as those nationally. A positive score means pupils in a school (on average) do better at KS2 than those nationally. A negative score means pupils (on average) do less well at KS2 than those nationally. Most schools’ progress scores fall in the range of -5 to +5.

 

Children sitting the key stage 2 tests this year were the first to be taught and assessed under the new national curriculum. The expected standard has been raised and the accountability framework for schools has also changed. These changes mean that the expected standard this year is higher and not comparable with the expected standard used in previous year’s statistics. It would therefore be incorrect and misleading to make direct comparisons showing changes over time.

For example, it is wrong to say that ‘the percentage of pupils achieving the expected standard in reading, writing and mathematics fell from 80% in 2015 to 53% in 2016’

In looking over time, all users of the statistics can say at this stage is that ‘53% of pupils achieved the new expected standard in 2016 when being taught and assessed against the higher standards expected under the new curriculum. Under the previous system, 80% of pupils achieved the standard that was expected under that system.’

Iain Bell, Head of Profession for Statistics at the Department for Education

Attainment and progress at Key Stage (KS) 1

Key Stage One

For 2016, a new set of KS1 national curriculum tests replaces the previous tests and tasks.

The new tests consist of:

  • English reading Papers 1 and 2
  • English grammar, punctuation and spelling Paper 1: spelling and Paper 2: questions
  • Mathematics Paper 1: arithmetic and Paper 2: reasoning

There is no longer a test or task for English writing.

The tests are administered as part of normal class room practice during May.  Teachers use the outcomes of the tests, along with a broad range of other evidence, to inform their teacher assessments.  For 2016 the Interim Teachers Assessment Framework for KS1 and the Interim Pre Key Stage Standards for KS1 are the standards against which teachers will make their assessments.

In reading, writing and maths, depending on a child’s depth of understanding of the KS1 programme of study, they may be assessed as either working towards the expected standard, working at the expected standard or working at greater depth within the expected standard.  Additionally, if a pupil has reached the chronological age where an outcome must be reported but the pupil is deemed not to have completed the key stage 1 programme of study, then they may be assessed as working at the foundations for the expected standard.  For science, children may be assessed as either working at the expected standard or working below the expected standard.

Attainment at the end of KS1

 

Teacher assessment at the end of KS1 –percentage of children reaching expected or greater depth

Reading

80%- Kingfield 74%- National

Writing

67%- Kingfield

65%- National

Maths

73%- Kingfield

73%- National

SPAG

63%

Combined- Reading, Writing and Maths

63%

Teacher assessment at the end of KS1 –percentage of children reaching greater depth

Reading

30%- Kingfield

24%- National

Writing

17%- Kingfield

13%- National

Maths

10%- Kingfield

18%- National

SPAG

 

Combined- Reading, Writing and Maths

3%

 

 

KS2 SATS results

Key Stage Two

For 2016, a new set of KS2 national curriculum tests was introduced consisting of:

  • English reading : reading booklet and associated answer booklet
  • English grammar, punctuation and spelling Paper 1: short answer questions
  • English grammar, punctuation and spelling Paper 2: spelling
  • mathematics Paper 1: arithmetic
  • mathematics Paper 2: reasoning
  • mathematics Paper 3: reasoning

There is only 1 set of tests for each subject. The tests include a small number of questions designed to assess the most able pupils so separate tests, such as the previous level 6 tests, are no longer required.

The mental mathematics test has been replaced with an arithmetic test.

Most children in Year Six will sit the tests, and they will be administered during May.

In addition, science sampling tests are taken biennially in a sample of schools selected by the STA.  The STA contact selected schools early in the spring term. If selected, representatives from the STA administer the tests.

In addition to the outcomes of the tests, teachers will also use a broad range of other evidence to inform their teacher assessments.  The Interim Teachers Assessment Framework for KS2 and the Interim Pre Key Stage Standards for KS2 are the standards against which teachers make their assessments.

For reading, maths and science, depending on a child’s depth of understanding of the KS2 programme of study, they may be teacher assessed as either working at the expected standard or working below the expected standard.  For writing, there is a broader range of possible teacher assessment outcomes as this is the sole measure of pupil attainment in writing at the end of KS2.  For writing, they may be assessed as either working towards the expected standard, working at the expected standard or working at greater depth within the expected standard.  Additionally, if a pupil has reached the chronological age where an outcome must be reported but the pupil is deemed not to have completed the key stage 2 programme of study, then they may be teacher assessed in reading, writing and maths as having achieved either the foundations for the expected standard, early development of the expected standard or growing development of the expected standard.

KS2 reading

%

% reaching the expected standard

81% Average progress: -0.19

% reaching the expected standard National

% reaching the higher standard

% reaching the higher standard National

Average scaled score

National

66%

 

27%

19%

104.9

102.6

KS2 mathematics

 

% reaching the expected standard

77% Average progress: -2.47

National

% reaching the higher standard

National

Average Scaled Score

National

70%

8%

17%

102.6

103

Grammar, punctuation and spelling (GPS)

 

% reaching the expected standard

85%

National

Writing

%reaching the expected standard

National

% reaching the higher standard

National

 

72%

 

77%   Average progress: -2.99

74%

19%

15%

Combined- reading, writing, maths

 

% reaching the expected standard

65%

National

53%

DFE School performance Website

Follow the link below to access data from the DFE School Performance Tables website. You will be able to see how the school performed at Key Stage 2 in 2016.

 

https://www.gov.uk/school-performance-tables